#Curriculum, #Teaching&Learning, Leadership, Learning, Preparing for Adulthood

Rebuilding Communities in Education – Part 2

By Anita Devi

I am grateful for the feedback, I had to Part 1 of this reflection piece. Leaders valued the list of questions and broader thinking.  Many could see how, for the benefit of our learners and within a culture of high accountability, we can still capitalise on greater autonomous leadership, at local level. Key actions and announcements by national leaders have also helped me realise, we have different perspectives on the construct ‘rebuild’.  In Part 2, I continue my thinking around the learners, the operational and the strategic.  However, I begin, by defining ‘rebuild’.

Rebuild is NOT about going back to what was, but defining the new; something better that meets the needs of where we are, not where we were.  I think we can all agree the experience of the pandemic (2020-21) crossing two academic years has changed us!  In September 2020, speaking on a radio programme about ‘Returning to School’, I talked about the ‘spectrum of experience’.  Lockdown and COVID19 may be part of the global vocabulary, but what they mean to each of us differs.  At one end of the experience spectrum is a positive experience – we have learnt new things, had quality time with family, perhaps and embarked on new online adventures of connecting, to name a few.  At the other end of the spectrum is bereavement, living in cramped conditions, no connection to people, no online access and so on.  We’ve all experienced grief and loss, as I shared in Part 1.  For most of us, our lockdown experience lies in the middle of the two extremes – we are weighing up multiple experiences and emotions, simultaneously. That’s taxing.  I recall Easter 2020 vividly. That weekend, usually a joyous festival for my family and community – I was informed of a few teaching colleagues who had passed due to COVID19 and the death of a friend’s sister-in-law.  Three months prior, this lady, a mother of two – she and I had been dancing at our friend’s 50th birthday party.  Equally on Easter weekend, I had a lot of online laughs and helped another friend surprise his wife on date night, as she is a medical key worker.  As Sunday night came to end, I was a bundle of emotions.  That was just one weekend of the many over the last year. It’s been a real mix.  I remember listening to a young man in America – during lockdown 1, he had lost 7 members of his family.  We cannot discount the personalised experience individuals have had.  The DfE guidance document on Mental Health and Behaviour in Schools (2018) would define the pandemic as an adverse childhood experience (ACE).  As such, our response to the rebuild, has to bear all of this in mind.

Learners

I have already considered aspects of mental health in Part 1.  In this section, I want us to focus on speaking and listening skills.  These are the root for learning – developmentally and socially. Learning does not happen in isolation.  In England, speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) has been a long-standing problem.

Source The Communication Trust

If you are interested in reading more on this, look up the reports A generation adrift (2013) and Talking about a generation (2017).  Even the most conversant families have shared that communication during lockdown has been challenged because there is little or nothing new to talk about at the dinner table.

As educators, I do believe we have a responsibility to restore and develop skills of oral communication.  This is a two-step process:

Step 1:  Consider different strategies to integrate institution-wide approaches to metacognition.  This is about giving learners a ‘language for learning’, so they can think and then talk about their learning.  The Education Endowment Foundation website clearly demonstrates that this is a low-cost intervention, with a potential 7-month gain.  The school year in England equates to 195 days.  That equates to 39 weeks and just under 8 months.  If metacognition recognises a 7-month gain, then surely an important part of the rebuild should include an intentional approach to metacognition.  Questions I raise in Part 1 of this blog are a starting point.

Step 2: Investing time in speaking and listening and not placing an over emphasis on writing.  Please do not mis-interpret what I am saying here.  Writing is an important skill.  However, individuals who think and speak with clarity often make the most effective writers. As a method of differentiation (high-quality teaching) the use of alternative method of recording has been considered a powerful tool for learners to demonstrate progress and achievement.

In 2010, The Communication Trust launched No Pens Day, now know as No Pens Wednesday.  No Pens Day Wednesday encourages learners to put down their pens and pick up their language skills by spending one day focusing on learning through speaking and listening.  You can find out more here and here. I’m certainly not advocating this as an everyday approach, but as a focus for returning to education in March 2021 or just after the Easter holidays, it would make for a way to get everyone talking and connecting. It’s a lot of fun too! Speaking gives a voice to the views, feelings and wishes of learners. Section 19 of the Children and Families Act 2014, makes this a statutory duty for us as educators.

Operational

It is the first day back – 8th March 2021:  How are you going to greet your learners?  Is it business as usual?  Or is there a need to listen?  I have been thinking about the power of stories and personal narratives.  Each one of us is part of the COVID19 story.  Each one of us played our part.  In the classroom, how can we utilise these historical lived-out narratives (possibly intertwined with the curriculum) to create a broader picture of the community experience, at large.

I have trained several new teachers and those new to leadership, throughout the pandemic, as well as those more experienced. Whilst it is a challenging time to be in education, it is also an exciting time to be part of the rebuild. As educators, how much of our own story will we share?

In 2014, I was asked to sum up the SEND Reforms in one word.  My word was: relationships.  Research has shown time and time again, the heart of good teaching, that has impact, is ‘relationships’.  The educator knowing not just their subject and effective pedagogy ,but knowing the learner too. It is the dynamic of these two that make the learning environment come to life.  Therefore, as you start planning face-to-face lessons consider using a one-page profile person-centred tool.  You can find out more here.  Also think about the different ways to differentiate and personalise.  Again, you can find out more here.

On a practical level, do look at the Public Health England (online course) on Psychological First Aid (PFA).  This is a straightforward way of delivering psychosocial care in the immediate aftermath of emergencies, including infectious disease outbreaks. 

Strategic

In my own mind, I am clear on the strategic leadership and embedding an institution-wide ‘new’ culture.  I led a roundtable with executive and senior leaders in education on this last week.  I do not claim to have all the answers, but certainly the framework of thinking I shared resonated with leaders in the field.   For this blog, however, I decided to revisit what the DfE has to say.  I was delighted to note … remarkably like my thinking.  In Mental Health and Behaviour in Schools (2018), it says (DfE, p9)

  1. Define the vision.  As leaders, what is your vision going forward?  What elements of pre-COVID19 will you keep?  What elements of the pandemic experience will you sustain?  How will these mesh together?  To give an example, I know some schools are considering an onsite blended learning curriculum from September 2021.  Recognition that online learning benefited some learners, due thought and consideration is being given to how this is fitted into the timetable.  Other schools have taken onboard how at the start of Lockdown 1, they did not know if the parents of their children were key workers.  These school leaders are looking into stronger home-school links.  This is such an opportunity for us to learn from the past and build anew.
  2. Emphasis on positive mental wellbeing for all (DfE p9).  Are there aspects of the organisation that lead to excessive stress for learners and staff?  What can be changed or undertaken differently?  How will high-quality teaching embrace a focus on positive mental wellbeing, not as an add-on, but a central theme for progress?
  3. Action 3 (DfE, p9) is a whole school approach to behaviour policy.  Yet in the current political thinking, this has been placed as a priority.  Can I be bold to say, what was before isn’t the same as is now!  I agree, we need a behaviour policy, but equally we need to recognise the experience we have had.  Behaviour (individual and collective) is born out of beliefs.  Have the beliefs of our community and world changed, because of the pandemic? What impact will this have on our behaviours?  I do advocate clarity on boundaries.  However, COVID19 has blurred the distinction on boundaries and barriers.  So collectively, we need to redefine (using a constructive theory of change) what we do and how.  Prior to COVID19, the focus on behaviour was (or certainly appeared to be) from a place of coercion and bringing institutions into line.  We are no longer in that space.

As learners return on 8th March 2021, reminding them and staff of the expected behaviours and boundaries is going to be vital.  The question is how it is done, to have impact, whilst still being sensitive of individuals coming through, what for many has been a traumatic experience.  Relationships of trust will need to be re-established. Plotting the academic calendar against the government’s four steps for coming out of lockdown is helpful for defining key time markers.

I started Part 1 with a quote from Nelson Mandela.  I’ve been thinking a lot about Nelson Mandela recently. Just over 30 years ago, he was released from a 27-year prison sentence, based on racial prejudice. On his release, in his first public speech, he cited a poem by Marianne Williamson called, “Our Deepest Fear”. This poem is from her book ‘Return to Love’ (Reflections & Principles of a Course in Miracles, 1976).

Born & brought up in London, I faced a fair amount of racial discrimination (overt & covert), during my childhood days. The ‘Our Deepest Fear’ poem had a significant impact on me, as a young adult at the time. It is something, I still revisit, as a reminder of what was, what is & what could be.  As we emerge out of the prison sentence of the pandemic, what will we share with world? What will be our Return to Love moment?

(For any readers who are not sure on what love has to do with leadership, I suggest you look up recent research (published in academic journals) on ‘Loving Leadership’ or even watch my presentation at the recent #GettingItRight Conference 2021).

It’s time for change!

#TeamADL You know, we know SEND Leadership – subscribe to our blog and follow us on social media to keep up to date www.teamadl.uk

About Anita Devi

As a former SENCO, Senior Leader, School Improvement Advisor, local authority SEND Advisory Teacher and Healthwatch Trustee, Anita Devi carries a wealth of experience in developing Leaders of Learning.  Her own teaching career spans early years to post grad in the UK and overseas and Anita lives her why through her belief in the joy of learning and the power of purpose.  In 2017, Anita was awarded the prestigious international Influential Educational Leaders Award for her SEND Leadership Pipeline strategy developing professionals from initial teacher training to advanced and experienced SENCOs.  Currently a PT PhD student, Changemaker Education Consultant & Founding CEO of #TeamADL (a not-for-profit) In 2019, the team were selected as finalists for The Disability Awards alongside some top multinational companies. More recently, working with NASBTT, Anita has written the first SEND book for Early Career Teachers.  #TeamADL have also launched in 2020 SEND Leaders Connect Advanced and SEND Leaders’ Appreciation Day.

#Curriculum, Leadership, Learning, Preparing for Adulthood, Purpose, SEND

Rebuilding Communities in Education (Part 1)

By Anita Devi

At the start of half-term (February 2021), I woke up to a vivid dream, I had had in my sleep:  I was at an educational institution, I use to work at.  This was positioned in the future.  The place was buzzing! There was a real coming together of different generations all learning different things (academic, the arts, and vocational studies).  This institution was back to being the learning hub of the community.  Some of you might say educational institutions have remained the learning hub throughout COVID19 and lockdown.  To some extent, this is true.  However, equally we have lost much that we need to regain as well as define and rebuild a new world going forward. in this blog two-part blog, I hope to share some thoughts on rebuilding communities in education.  I do not claim to be an expert, but I have given this some thought and held roundtable table discussions with other thought-leaders.  In each part, I will focus on the learner, the operational and the strategic.  Both parts have a different emphasis, but I believe, it is this twin track of thought, that will enable us to rebuild together.

Nelson Mandela is often quoted as saying, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”  COVID19 was a global war and this blog is all about how we find or re-establish peacetime.  SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes Covid-19 has recently been reviewed in Forbes (August 2020) as to whether it makes for a good bioweapon.  Biological warfare and bioterrorism are not new.  Historically, the United States, Iraq, former Soviet Union, United Kingdom, Japan, and Canada all used to have biological weapons programs.  As a young adult working in London, I distinctly recall being involved in peace politics’ services to commemorate the 44th Hiroshima Day (6th August 1945).  Over a decade ago, training teachers in Vietnam, I visited The War Remnants Museum in Ho Chi Min City, where I saw how Orange Agent had led to an increase in disability amongst children and unborn babies. The impact of global events like this last and that is why it is important I feel, for us to start focusing on the rebuild.

The Learner

Over the episodes of lockdowns and reintegration, emphasis has been placed on mental health, particularly of learners. The World Health Organisation (WHO) states in its constitution that “Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”  Globally, therefore we have been challenged by the pandemic itself, as well as the hidden consequential health symptoms.  As the vaccination programme is rolled out and we begin to regroup, it is this holistic dimension of health, we need to consider.  One bright young man in my neighbourhood is an avid cricket player.  Being denied the ability to play, meet with his team-mates and enjoy this past time has made him question the point of getting up each morning.  Equally, younger aged children from one of my networks are now determined to work in the medical field to find cures to diseases known and unknow to mankind.  The point I am making; this has affected us all differently.  Lockdown & COVID19 may be global terms, but what it means to each of us experientially will differ.  The differential is due to seen and unseen factors.  What I can say with certainty is, at some level we have ALL experienced grief and loss.  This is not just about losing loved one.  Though, that carries a deeper level of pain and grief.  However, not being able to do, say or relate in normal ways has been a challenge.

Recognising this loss and grief as a universal event, and yet a personal experience hopefully will make those of us who teach think about conversations and relationships in the classroom.  From an individual and community rebuilding perspective, we need to keep asking each other about our experience and what that meant.  This will not only help to unpeel layers, but it will aid the healing process too. Teaching in London, after 9-11, I made an independent decision to put the formal curriculum on hold and focus all learning on ‘I belong to a community, where I am loved and respected’.  The school was located in economically deprived area and my year group came from a mix of ethnic backgrounds, which included two Muslim boys.  We talked a lot during that time, we defined our dreams for the future, as well as gave voice to our fears.  It took three days of a variety of learning PSHE / Citizenship activities before the prejudice towards the two Muslim boys manifested.  The children wanted to blame someone, in order to make sense of their world being turned upside down.  As a community, we were hurting.  I am a Christian, by faith and we believe strongly that when one person is hurt, we (as a body) are all affected.  We addressed the misdirected views in a wholesome way and established a healthy learning community in the school, one again.  Imagine, if I had just done a tokenistic ‘how do you feel?’ mental health check-in activity and then moved onto the curriculum.  The prejudice and fear would have still existed and continued to grow undercover.  By brining it out into the open, we were able to challenge false beliefs and reunite.

Consider:

  • What beliefs (true or false) have the learners we care about developed regarding COVID19 and humanity, as a whole?
  • How will this experience affect their dreams for the future?
  • What questions do our learners have?

I am not saying we need to have all the answers, but we do need to make space for conversations.

Social emotional mental health does not happen in isolation.  The three dimensions are connected.  Too often, we just focus on mental health.  Yet, making time for the social and emotional will feed into better mental health.  Spend time exploring each and the interconnectivity between the three.  You can find a few ideas here

Before I move onto operational thoughts, I want to raise the point that there is a fine line between anxiety and fear, though they can both manifest similar symptoms.  The continuum of time (past, present and future) can trigger different stress responses.  I am no expert in this area, though I do have a basic knowledge.  What I can say, though in the days ahead we are going to need to be observant of our learners, noting any patterns, sudden changes and spirals of decline or unusual hysteria.  Critical to our observation antennas being acutely sharpened, it is important we establish good relationships with our learners.  They need to know there is someone they can talk to; someone who will listen, respect them and help (including signposting or referrals to specialists). As practitioners, we need to do this, whilst being mindful of our own mental health and wellbeing needs.

Operational

Two core elements of developing resilience are self-efficacy and social problem solving. Curiosity can be the result of interest and/or the lack of information, knowledge, and skills in an area.  As we connect back in our classrooms over the academic year, think about how the curriculum can be delivered through an increase in problem solving activities.  This will help our learners begin to re-establish a sense of agency and autonomy.  A few young people have shared with me their sense of helplessness during this pandemic.  For many they are filled with questions about identity and purpose.  Engaging young people in social problem solving, through the curriculum enables young people to make choices and think things through.

We need to identify gaps in learning and embed pathways for progress, but fundamental to this will be the learner’s own aspirations.  Aspirations connect the future, with core activity in the now.  Using classroom activities to demonstrate to learners they can make a difference and they can have an impact; we are establishing a foundation for dreaming and achieving.  A deeper skill involved in problem solving is the ability to choose and recognise the consequences of choice.  This involves a broader range of critical thinking skills, which in time will feed in academic attainment and achievement, as well as socialisation skills.  Choice is something, we can and should offer our learners with complex needs too.  Fixed choice questions (A or B?) is still a choice and it puts the learner in control.

Strategic

In Part 2 of this article, I will invest time in unpacking on how we collectively can define the new normal.  For now, I ask you to take a piece of paper, reflect and note down:  what lessons have you personally and professionally learnt from COVID19?

I recently read an anonymous quote, “education is the passage to progress”.  What a beautiful image and something real and tangible as we emerge out of this life experience.  Therefore, using the thirteen types of knowledge, I leave you with thirteen questions to reflect on individually and as a team.  To be clear, knowledge in my mind relates also to awareness and familiarity gained through experience of a fact or situation.  There are no right answers to any of these questions … it is just about your view and experience. Both of these will shape your attitude, beliefs and behaviours in the rebuilding of communities in education.

1) Posteriori knowledge:  What have you learnt from COVID19 and lockdown?  What are your three key takeaways?

2) Priori knowledge:  What elements of your worldview are you retaining from a time before COVID19?

3) Dispersed knowledge:  How would you describe your lockdown experience?

4) Domain knowledge:  What specific areas of learning have you developed and enhanced during the pandemic?

5) Empirical knowledge:  What are your observations about the impact of COVID19 on your community and circle of influence?

6) Encoded knowledge:  Looking back, what signs or symbols will remind you of the pandemic?

7) Explicit knowledge: What artefacts of expression do you have of the COVID19 experience?

8) Known unknowns: List three questions you have about COVID19 and another three questions about the future, as we begin to rebuild?

9) Metaknowledge:  Can you think of any metaphors to describe the pandemic experience for you?

10) Procedural knowledge:  In responding to COVID19, are there any procedures you have adopted that you would keep, or are there things you use do, which you will now drop or improve?

11) Propositional knowledge:  What fact-based information can you recall about the COVID19 experience?

12) Situated knowledge:  How has your community grown or developed through the pandemic?  What has been the greatest loss and the greatest gain?  How do you know?

13) Tacit knowledge:  What have you gained mastery over during this season and what impact has this had on your emotional well-being?

I constructed these questions to help us all reflect to rebuild.  You may have better ones.  Do please share these in the comments. This will help us grow together.  Some leaders may choose to use these questions to structure a staff meeting or even stimulate conversations with our learners.  Part 2 of this blog will be published on 3rd March 2021.  Till then, stay safe.

Postscript:  As I started writing this piece, I received instructions from the NHS, that I am required to shield until 31st March 2021.  I had my first vaccination on 25th January 2021.  I have not been asked to shield prior to this and receiving the communication did make me reflect on how much I value choice and my freedom.

#TeamADL You know, we know SEND Leadership – subscribe to our blog and follow us on social media to keep up to date www.teamadl.uk

About Anita Devi

As a former SENCO, Senior Leader, School Improvement Advisor, local authority SEND Advisory Teacher and Healthwatch Trustee, Anita Devi carries a wealth of experience in developing Leaders of Learning.  Her own teaching career spans early years to post grad in the UK and overseas and Anita lives her why through her belief in the joy of learning and the power of purpose.  In 2017, Anita was awarded the prestigious international Influential Educational Leaders Award for her SEND Leadership Pipeline strategy developing professionals from initial teacher training to advanced and experienced SENCOs.  Currently a PT PhD student, Changemaker Education Consultant & Founding CEO of #TeamADL (a not-for-profit) In 2019, the team were selected as finalists for The Disability Awards alongside some top multinational companies. More recently, working with NASBTT, Anita has written the first SEND book for Early Career Teachers.  #TeamADL have also launched in 2020 SEND Leaders Connect Advanced and SEND Leaders’ Appreciation Day.

Employment, Learning, Parenting, Preparing for Adulthood, Social work

Reflections: Community Care Social Work Event

By Stephanie Lister

Once registered and inside the Business Design Centre in London, the somewhat subdued queue of social workers, managers and students were invited to attend any of the over thirty different legal sessions, seminars and interactive zones. These covered topics as varied as ‘Coroners Court Mock Inquest’, ‘Engaging Safely and Effectively with Perpetrators of Domestic Abuse’ and ‘Immigration Law and the Children Act: What are the Social Workers’ Responsibilities?’.  So much choice!  In this blog, I share insights from the four sessions I attended.

The first seminar was ‘Getting it Right in Transitions: Goals and Aspirations’ – a topic close to my heart and an area I worked in for over twelve years. I was pleased to see the focus was on the young person and what’s important to them, such as finding and keeping a job, things to do in their spare time, living independently and staying safe and healthy.  The discussions were grounded in the Care Act and adopted a strengths-based approach. Also covered was the need for joined up working with partners and supporting parents as their child moves into adulthood.  Associated positive risk needs to be juxtaposed with ongoing vulnerability.

 ‘Navigating the boundary between the Mental Health Act (1983) and the Mental Capacity Act (2005)’ was the title of my second seminar.  This was a legal learning session designed to broaden understanding of the scope of the two acts, the differences between them and how to decide which regime to follow in different scenarios. This was a relatively new topic for me, as I have limited experience working within the framework of the Mental Health Act, but some experience undertaking Mental Capacity Act assessments for young people over the age of sixteen. I found the topic both challenging and helpful.  It reminded me of a previous case where the young person, diagnosed with high functioning Autistic Spectrum Disorder had found it increasingly difficult to self-regulate.  This resulted in deteriorating mental health, increasing self-harm, isolation and risk to themselves and family. After much multidisciplinary debate regarding the needs and provision for this young person, a hospital place was found under the Mental Health Act.  They made good recovery and were able to return to supported living in a specialist educational setting. Having a clearer understanding of the Mental Health Act would have helped me advocate more directly in this case.

Stand up for what you believe in, even if you stand alone 

Suzy Kassem

Seminar three was a refresher entitled ‘NHS Continuing Healthcare and the Legal Limits of Local Authority Responsibility’. Continuing healthcare assessments were a regular part of my working life.  My role involved assisting and supporting young people and their parents/carers through the assessment process, balancing the tension between the Care Act 2014 sec 22(1) and the NHS Act, the various budget holders and the often-desperate needs of the family. This seminar highlighted again the need for clear understanding of what is a primary health need, how the characteristics of Intensity, Nature, Complexity and Unpredictability look across the domains of the assessment and how regional variations in assessment can lead to a ‘postcode lottery’ of funding being agreed. It raised the importance of accurate recording of evidence of risk, strengths and unmanaged needs within the framework of the domains outlined in the decision tool.

SW

The final seminar of the day was one based in adult services, but which occurs in families I’ve worked with.  The focus was ‘Trauma-Informed Practice with Adults who Self-Neglect or Hoard.’ The speaker, herself a survivor of trauma resulting in a form of hoarding, gave an insight into the effect of trauma on the brain, the way life events are then experienced through that lens or trigger and its effect on attachment. We were encouraged to recall three objects that were of sentimental value to us.  We were then instructed to keep one, recycle one and throw one away. We then had to recognise the emotions and physical responses we felt.  This simple activity was a helpful insight into the distress experienced by people when the outward signs are addressed, but not the healing of the trauma. A question was raised about how would a person’s executive function affect the outcome of, for example, a Mental Capacity Act assessment? as often those affected can ‘talk the talk’ i.e. tell the assessor the steps needed to carry out tasks, but are unable to ‘walk the walk’ i.e. actually carry out those tasks.  It was suggested treatment pathways that can be helpful such talking therapies, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Eye Movement Dual Task Therapy.

It was interesting to note that by the end of the day the attendees appeared more upbeat and re-energised and there was a definite buzz of enthusiasm. This was also something I noted in myself as although the day had been full on and exhausting, I felt a renewed sense of purpose and value.

Social work Seus

About Stephanie Lister

Stephanie has nineteen years’ experience as a Nursery Nurse working with children, who have special educational need and/or a disability (SEND).   With a desire to do more and advocate for individuals and families, Stephanie retrained in social work and subsequently dedicated twelve years to working in a local authority with a broad remit covering Children with Disabilities and Transitions into adulthood. Stephanie is a valued member of #TeamADL where she continues to advocate and find solutions in a social care context.

To find out more visit the #TeamADL website

#Teaching&Learning, Early Career Framework, Learning, Purpose

New, newness and learning

by Anita Devi

This month, instead a text-based blog, we’ve put together an 8 minute podcastThis is ‘new’ for us … we hope you enjoy!

Same old thinking.jpg

Break the cycle … and do something NEW today, this term, this year!

Comfort zone

About Anita Devi

Anita has had an extensive career in education.  Her why is based around the ‘joy of learning’.  As such, she focuses on what enables learners and what hinders them and more importantly, what can she do to improve the system.  Amongst many other roles, Anita leads #TeamADL

To find out more visit www.AnitaDevi.com