#Curriculum, #Teaching&Learning, Disability

Scaffolding support in primary PE curriculum for SEND pupils into adulthood

Interview with Jonathan Bhowmick (JB)

With a renewed focus on curriculum this year, Anita Devi (AD) caught up with Actions Mats to ask more about how we support pupils with special educational needs and disability (SEND) in Physical Education (PE), as part of the inclusion agenda and active lifestyles.

AD: Hi Jonathan, thank you for your time today.  Tell us a little about yourself.

JB: Hi Anita Well, I am the designer and founder of Action Mats. My background is playground design and working with a school, I was asked by the headteacher to design a solution for engaging pupils for whom English is an additional language (EAL).  Hence Action Mats were born.  The mats are a unique PE and active-learning resource created for children between 4 and 11 years old.  The thinking behind Action Mats is to create fitness stations.  These can used in multiple configurations.  They enable ALL pupils to engage in the PE curriculum as well as participate in team building challenges and competitive games. What we have also discovered since from user feedback is Action Mats work well for pupils with a special educational need and disability.  In effect, we have fulfilled our AIM in creating Action Inclusive Mats.

AD: How long have you been operating?

JB: Action Mats was launched in October 2017 and we are now in over one hundred schools in four countries. They were originally created for EAL pupils.  Our vision is for them engage in the lessons and so feel part of the school community.  The unique feature of Action Mats is the simple, yet fun, instructional graphics and symbols printed on each mat. Children of all ages, from any country, can understand these graphics without the need for explanation or translation. This empowers children, giving them the ability to work independently or collaboratively, without the need for teacher/ adult input.  Action Mats are active members of Youth Sports Trust, the Association for Physical Education and UK Active.

Action Mats 1

AD: Did you test the mats with the children?

JB: We tested the Action Mats quite extensively.  In late September 2019, we ran a new trial session at a primary school in Hertfordshire to test our active-learning mats, which incorporate the literacy and numeracy packs.  Thirty-two children in year 4 (8-year olds) tested our level 2 challenge jigsaw race mats.  Each challenge includes sixteen activities.  The activity was delivered as a race.  So, the pupils carry random pieces jigsaw pieces over a course of fitness stations to reach the ‘build zone’. In the Build-Zone, pupils must connect the piece they carry to existing pieces already there. The class was a mixed ability group.

AD: Sounds like quite a high-pace activity?

JB:  It is.  However, from a designer’s point of view, the successful completion of the jigsaw is rather secondary. The objective is for pupils to engage fully in the exercises on each mat. We want our children to be active and see sport, as an important lifestyle choice. A secondary objective is for the whole team to coalesce in the jigsaw build zone to assemble the pieces as a team, collectively. The game fosters teamwork on two levels, during the race section and working together to achieve a common goal.  Ideally before the other team.

AD:  What did you learn from this new trial?

JB:  I was really pleased with how successful the game was. The rationale behind the idea worked perfectly and, as the photos testify, the children were completely engrossed in the challenge.  In particular, the children shared they preferred the numeracy tasks linked to Action Mats and found it helped their concentration.  School leadership commented, “We found the sense of purpose linked to PE activities helpful or children’s learning and we believe teachers could use this accessible resource in many different ways, to engage the children”. As a follow-up, Action Mats was invited to run an active session at a PE Conference in Worcestershire at which we invited twenty PE Teachers to participate in the same game.  There was some initial reluctance, but once the teachers got into it, they found it more challenging than they had originally thought.  Their competitive side also surfaced.  We found their feedback useful.

Winning is important to me, but what brings me real joy is the experience of being fully engaged in whatever I’m doing – Phil Jackson

Action Mats 2

AD: The jigsaw appears to also help the slow down rest period, after an intense period of activity.  Is that how they were designed?  What is the recommended warm up to the fitness stations?

JB: In this scenario, the objective was to race the other team.  However, it is possible to use the jigsaw for downtime.  The Action Mat stations are used for the warm-up through a circuit-based activity.

AD: Can you give us an example where the mats have benefited children with special educational needs and disability (SEND)?

JB: Action Mats are be used by some special schools and we have anecdotal feedback about impact for SEND in mainstream schools. This is an are we are currently developing.

Sports England 2018

(Source: Sport England, 2018)

AD: London 2012, enabled us as a nation to take sport to a new level. Our pledge was to “Inspire a generation”. Yet, in 2018 Sport England reported just over 40% of children in England do an average of more than 60 minutes of physical activity a day. Our Active Lives Children and Young People Survey (2018), which was the first of its kind carried out by Ipsos MORI, showed that around 3 million children (43.3%) lead active lives.  However, of that group, only 1.2 million (17.5%) are meeting the Chief Medical Officer’s guidelines of more than 60 minutes of activity a day, every day of the week.  So, there is clearly a need to do more. The report also concluded an insignificant difference in the amount of sport and physical activity that takes place inside school, compared to activity levels outside of school.  Both have a critical role to play. With 22% of children active for at least 30 minutes per day outside of school, while 28% of children do so in school.  How do you think Action Mats can contribute to the national agenda for children of ‘being active and staying healthy’?

Life need not have limits – Richard Whitehead, a British athlete and Paralympian

JB: Action Mats can be delivered through structured teacher-led pedagogy.  The mats come with easy-to-follow activity cards.  Action Mats can also have high impact through learner-led activities.  So, the mats cover both differentiation and personalisation.  In some schools, Action Mats have promoted Family Fitness Sessions, where parents/carers join their children for stay healthy exercise sessions.  This helps promote good family relationships and positive role models, as well active lifestyles outside school.  Action Mats are portal and on suitable external surfaces can be used outside, in the fresh air.

Sports England 2017

(Source: Sports England, 2017)

AD: At #TeamADL, our vision is ‘Everyone thriving in education, employment and life’.  We were therefore concerned when we read in the 2015/16 survey 51% of adults with three or more impairments are inactive compared with 21% of those without a disability. So, my final question to you, what can we do differently to increase activity for those with impairments?

JB: Take the principles of Action Mats and apply them widely.  In other words, simplicity, accessibility and inclusivity.  Richard Whitehead, a British athlete and Paralympian once said, “Life need not have limits”.  This is so true of the philosophy of Action Mats.  The mats are enablers for children to stretch themselves that little bit further, with the hope it becomes a lifestyle choice for their adulthood.  Do check out our video and hear what teachers and PE specialists have said.

AD: Thank you Jonathan once again for your time.  We wish you the very best going forward.  Keep us posted of any updates!

To find out more about Action Mats visit: https://www.actionmats.co.uk/

Chrispina Wilson from #TeamADL is also actively involved in supporting healthy lifestyles and reducing obesity for all children and young people. Contact us to find out more.

Employment, Learning, Parenting, Preparing for Adulthood, Social work

Reflections: Community Care Social Work Event

By Stephanie Lister

Once registered and inside the Business Design Centre in London, the somewhat subdued queue of social workers, managers and students were invited to attend any of the over thirty different legal sessions, seminars and interactive zones. These covered topics as varied as ‘Coroners Court Mock Inquest’, ‘Engaging Safely and Effectively with Perpetrators of Domestic Abuse’ and ‘Immigration Law and the Children Act: What are the Social Workers’ Responsibilities?’.  So much choice!  In this blog, I share insights from the four sessions I attended.

The first seminar was ‘Getting it Right in Transitions: Goals and Aspirations’ – a topic close to my heart and an area I worked in for over twelve years. I was pleased to see the focus was on the young person and what’s important to them, such as finding and keeping a job, things to do in their spare time, living independently and staying safe and healthy.  The discussions were grounded in the Care Act and adopted a strengths-based approach. Also covered was the need for joined up working with partners and supporting parents as their child moves into adulthood.  Associated positive risk needs to be juxtaposed with ongoing vulnerability.

 ‘Navigating the boundary between the Mental Health Act (1983) and the Mental Capacity Act (2005)’ was the title of my second seminar.  This was a legal learning session designed to broaden understanding of the scope of the two acts, the differences between them and how to decide which regime to follow in different scenarios. This was a relatively new topic for me, as I have limited experience working within the framework of the Mental Health Act, but some experience undertaking Mental Capacity Act assessments for young people over the age of sixteen. I found the topic both challenging and helpful.  It reminded me of a previous case where the young person, diagnosed with high functioning Autistic Spectrum Disorder had found it increasingly difficult to self-regulate.  This resulted in deteriorating mental health, increasing self-harm, isolation and risk to themselves and family. After much multidisciplinary debate regarding the needs and provision for this young person, a hospital place was found under the Mental Health Act.  They made good recovery and were able to return to supported living in a specialist educational setting. Having a clearer understanding of the Mental Health Act would have helped me advocate more directly in this case.

Stand up for what you believe in, even if you stand alone 

Suzy Kassem

Seminar three was a refresher entitled ‘NHS Continuing Healthcare and the Legal Limits of Local Authority Responsibility’. Continuing healthcare assessments were a regular part of my working life.  My role involved assisting and supporting young people and their parents/carers through the assessment process, balancing the tension between the Care Act 2014 sec 22(1) and the NHS Act, the various budget holders and the often-desperate needs of the family. This seminar highlighted again the need for clear understanding of what is a primary health need, how the characteristics of Intensity, Nature, Complexity and Unpredictability look across the domains of the assessment and how regional variations in assessment can lead to a ‘postcode lottery’ of funding being agreed. It raised the importance of accurate recording of evidence of risk, strengths and unmanaged needs within the framework of the domains outlined in the decision tool.

SW

The final seminar of the day was one based in adult services, but which occurs in families I’ve worked with.  The focus was ‘Trauma-Informed Practice with Adults who Self-Neglect or Hoard.’ The speaker, herself a survivor of trauma resulting in a form of hoarding, gave an insight into the effect of trauma on the brain, the way life events are then experienced through that lens or trigger and its effect on attachment. We were encouraged to recall three objects that were of sentimental value to us.  We were then instructed to keep one, recycle one and throw one away. We then had to recognise the emotions and physical responses we felt.  This simple activity was a helpful insight into the distress experienced by people when the outward signs are addressed, but not the healing of the trauma. A question was raised about how would a person’s executive function affect the outcome of, for example, a Mental Capacity Act assessment? as often those affected can ‘talk the talk’ i.e. tell the assessor the steps needed to carry out tasks, but are unable to ‘walk the walk’ i.e. actually carry out those tasks.  It was suggested treatment pathways that can be helpful such talking therapies, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Eye Movement Dual Task Therapy.

It was interesting to note that by the end of the day the attendees appeared more upbeat and re-energised and there was a definite buzz of enthusiasm. This was also something I noted in myself as although the day had been full on and exhausting, I felt a renewed sense of purpose and value.

Social work Seus

About Stephanie Lister

Stephanie has nineteen years’ experience as a Nursery Nurse working with children, who have special educational need and/or a disability (SEND).   With a desire to do more and advocate for individuals and families, Stephanie retrained in social work and subsequently dedicated twelve years to working in a local authority with a broad remit covering Children with Disabilities and Transitions into adulthood. Stephanie is a valued member of #TeamADL where she continues to advocate and find solutions in a social care context.

To find out more visit the #TeamADL website

#Curriculum, #Teaching&Learning, Early Career Framework, Parenting, SEND

Meeting Jonathan!

By Anita Devi

Last month, I had the absolute privilege of meeting Jonathan Bryan !!! I’d been following Jonathan’s story for awhile on Twitter @eyecantalk and in the press.  I’d read his book, which I highly recommend, so I wanted to meet him and his mum, Chantal.  I had so many questions.

This blog is my attempt at summarising an incredible three hours spent with Jonathan, at his home.

Dual Multiple Exceptionality (DME)

My interest in children and young people, who had special educational needs and were more able started around 2007.  Working with different agencies including the National Association of Gifted Children (now Potential Plus), I was keen to find out how we identify and encourage the ‘ability’ in ‘disability.  I researched case studies from America (where DME is referred to as Twice Exceptional or 2E), I delivered a few presentations/ workshops and more importantly, I incorporated it into my practice as a SEN Advisory Teacher, undertaking statutory assessment. Around the same time, The National Strategies also launched their thinking around DME.  The discussion was beginning to develop momentum. We were starting to distinguish between identification and support strategies for those born with a disability, who had DME and those who had acquired a disability, after the more able aspect of their talent had been discovered e.g. Professor Stephen Hawking or Jean-Dominique Bauby (Diving Bell and the Butterfly).  Three years on and post-election, the signs in Whitehall had changed, as had the government agenda for education.  DME was put on the back burner.

Despite this setback, I continued to research the subject.  My interest homed in particularly on assessment, especially since ‘Life without Levels’ and the Engagement Profile / Scale research by Barry Carpenter and his team, was a great opportunity to further this discussion in special schools with head teachers.

Almost 10 years after I first started looking into DME, Pearson published a two-part blog by me on the subject.  The article was entitled, “What can’t my child excel and have a difficulty / disability at the same time?” Part 1 | Part 2.  Eighteen months later, nasen published their Current State of Play Report on DME.  Professor Stephen Hawking became a Patron of nasen, however as mentioned earlier, his was an acquired disability.  There is still much to discover about children born with a disability, who are cognitively able, but not always endowed with the ability to express it.

I do not want to give away too much about Jonathan’s story, as I really would encourage you to read his book.  Through ‘Eye Can Write‘, I met Chantal his mother, understood the circumstances leading up to his birth and the many difficulties they faced after he was born, including times when the hospital gave Jonathan hours to live.

Eyes Can Write

Jonathan is now 13 years old.  He has no voluntary control over his body or speech, and he is on an oxygen tank.  He has two younger sisters and a very busy schedule.  Jonathan was attending a school for children with Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties (PMLD), when one of his teachers noticed active cognitive processing, behind his disability.  Long story short, Jonathan moved into mainstream, learnt to read, communicate in his own way and thrived.

Here is a reverse poem, he wrote recently for Poetry Day (21st March 2019).  Using the structure of an existing poem, Jonathan created his own, giving a voice to his thoughts and ideas.

Poem v2

So, what happened when I met Jonathan?

My first question was to Chantal.  Given all that has happened and the challenges, how is it you remain so calm?   Smilingly Chantal replied,

There are days, when the oxygen masks haven’t arrived or something else isn’t in place … and it can be overwhelming.  But I have a choice and I intentionally choose not to be angry.  It isn’t always easy, but the anger doesn’t solve anything.  If anything, it creates more problems.

Chantal, his home-teacher (Sarah) and I continued talking about many things … at which point Jonathan interrupted us.  Using his eyes, he spelt out the following message to me,

I just want an education system where we are all considered worthy to be taught and learn.  How can I make a difference, Anita?

Yes, he knew my name!  Part of my curiosity about Jonathan also stemmed from his phenomenal working memory.  Imagine using your eyes to point to a letter in a word, a word in a sentence, a sentence in a paragraph and a paragraph in a context/ chapter.  That’s what Jonathan had just done!

Reflecting on the discussion, I realised, we had been talking about provision in special schools and sensorial experiences.  Whilst these are necessary and helpful, Jonathan was trying to communicate to me … there is SO much more to us that just ‘experiencing’ a sensory stimulation or curriculum.

So, let me share some more golden nuggets, Jonathan spelt out to me, with his eyes:

I would love that if people see what is possible, maybe they will want to try and unlock others.

My story is not unique, and it should be shared.  I don’t have long here, so what should I spend my time doing?  I am a thirteen-year-old … and I’m always hungry!

I dream of every teacher finding ways to teach every child.

… and finally,

  • Trainee teachers need the why
  • Teachers need the how
  • Parents need the what
  • Leaders need to believe

What an incredible blueprint for teacher – leader development and the Early Career Framework.  I have no idea how the time passed … we covered so much.  But it was noon and Jonathan had to get ready for school.  As I drove away from their home … I was in awe.  This young thirteen-year-old had taught me SO much!  He had understood what we had discussed and responded in a way, that stretched our perceptions to a new level of thinking and believing.  What an absolute privilege! I was inspired and humbled.

JR Photo Medley v2

Jonathan and his family have set up a charity to focus exactly on what we spoke about, unlocking potential.  The charity is called ‘Teach us too’ and the remit is simply ‘to change the experiences of others in a similar position’.  There are some great plans for the charity to develop over the next year and #TeamADL very much look forward to walking alongside Jonathan and the charity in advocating the message “Teach us Too”.

Call to action:

Think about the children and young people you teach:

  • Are there any who have a special educational need and/or disability AND are more able?
  • What further research do you need to undertake about DME?
  • Does you setting have a policy and more importantly provision in place to ‘unlock’ and support DME?

 

About Anita Devi

Anita has had an extensive career in education.  Her why is based around the ‘joy of learning’.  As such, she focuses on what enables learners and what hinders them and more importantly, what can she do to improve the system.  Amongst many other roles, Anita leads #TeamADL

To find out more visit www.AnitaDevi.com

SEND

SEND: We need to learn to synthesise information better!

By Anita Devi

Over the last two months, I have doing more in-depth work on the ‘Four Broad Areas of Need’.  This has included training, talking to parents, writing, working with leaders in a variety of roles and I’ve been looking at the quality of Education Health Care Plans (EHCPs).  In this blog, I seek to raise some of the unanswered questions, that I think is hindering the effectiveness of the SEND Reforms being realised.  This is not a fait accompli piece, just a few current thoughts.

I have already contributed some of my thoughts to the current #SENDInquiry Here I specifically wish to focus on how needs are synthesised to form a holistic picture of the child or young person.

The construct ‘Areas of Need’ (a legacy of the SEN Code of Practice 2001), I believe evolved from the shift in thinking from a medical model to a social model of disability in the 1970s.  However, it probably become more relevant when considering data analysis of need.  The SEND Reforms (2011-2018) saw a shift in emphasis in one area of need; from behaviour, emotional and social development (BESD) to social, emotional mental health (SEMH). These ‘areas of need’ are not directly referenced in the primary statutory legislation (The SEND Regulations / Children & Families Act 2014). However, they are discussed in the secondary statutory instrument, known as The 0-25 years SEND Code of Practice (2015), SENDCoP hereafter.

My own interest in the ‘Four Areas of Need’ and working with settings on this, since the SENDCoP was originally published in 2014, was triggered by 6.25, which states,

When reviewing and managing special educational provision the broad areas of need and support outlined from 6.28 below may be helpful, and schools should review how well equipped they are to provide support across these areas.”

At this point, I’m sure many colleagues may possibly think, ‘Oh she’s talking about Provision Mapping, Provision Management or SEND Reviews’.  I’m not, though there is some overlap.  For me, 6.25 goes further than just a review.  It’s about strategic leadership that is supported by a depth of knowledge and resources in all four areas.  It’s an understanding of holistic educational provision.

The second nudge for me came from The Rochford Review 2016 (Recommendation 3):

“Schools assess pupils’ development in all 4 areas of need outlined in the SEND Code of Practice, but statutory assessment for pupils who are not engaged in subject-specific learning should be limited to the area of cognition and learning.”

Hence began my work with a wide range of stakeholders on:

  • How well do settings / local areas assess in the four areas of need?
  • How well resourced are they to support the four areas of need?

The conversations have been varying and some dovetailed into work I undertook with local authorities on developing a ‘Written Statement of Action’, enhancing consistency of decision making for Educational Health Care Assessment (EHCAs) and EHCPs, as well looking at the quality of Assessment Advices that contribute to an EHCP.  Since 2011, working with Pathfinders and others, I’ve been in involved in numerous quality assurance (QA) activities on EHCPs; with a vision to see how this can be included as part of the 20-week cycle, not after the plan has been issued and agreed.  Other #TeamADL members are also looking at the QA process of EHCPs.  Sadly, I have yet to see a gold standard EHCP or see a system that embraces a QA process, as part of the 20-week cycle.  This has made me question several things.

Under the previous system, Statements were assessed and issued in a 26-week cycle.   We struggled to QA fully then, often taking just a random sample of cases.  What made us think, we could improve the quality of plans in a shorter time?  In pursuing speed, have we compromised further on quality?  The 20-week cycle is enshrined in law, but it is certainly something we need to consider.  Would families be happier with a slightly longer timeline, knowing that at the end of it, they would get a better quality plan that has been quality assured?

Back to ‘Areas of Need’. As a previous SEND Advisory Teacher, who use to undertake statutory assessment and sit on Panel, I recall how much time and thought I had to put into evaluating the diverse and what sometimes appeared contradictory evidence to truly narrow in on need and identify what was required in terms of support.  In reflecting on support, I also had to consider, whether the proposed intervention was long-term or short-term.  Was it to develop an adaptation independence skill (e.g. social stories on safety) or move a child or young person on to the next point, or indeed, was it something needed long-term (e.g. visualiser)? Since the SEND Reforms, these are not questions, I see colleagues asking and I genuinely feel we should.  Implementing short-term support, does not take away from the need of the child.  Instead, if accurate and appropriate, it provides a way of managing and supporting needs through inclusive practice.

Four Areas of Need

Prior to this role as an Advisory Teacher, I led SEN in a school, as a SENCO.  I was never keen on discussions about primary need or secondary need.  I insisted my team saw the four areas of need as a Venn Diagram.  So, we discussed overlaps, consequential needs etc.  The conversations amongst us as a team and with families were far more constructive.  Our approach rippled out to any external specialists commissioned for their input.  What this meant was we started see coherent and strategic multi-agency working.  On many occasions, in my SEND Advisory role, I recall undertaking joint observations assessments with members of other teams.  When we saw OT waiting lists were not being met, across local authority teams we worked on up-skilling setting staff on universal & targeted provision for co-ordination difficulties.  The impact – waiting lists went down and children’s needs were met in a timely manner.  Imagine that change model with mental health and CAMHS!  This is one of the many visions behind #TeamADL and the work we do in #MentalHealth

A carer recently said to me,

“When we were struggling with two boys with severe attachment issues, we had conflicting advice from social workers, psychologists, and others.   We worked a lot out for ourselves which meant sourcing and reviewing a lot of information ourselves.  We are a lot more therapeutic with our practice now, but even now there are those who don’t understand or agree with how we approach things. Many different voices, plus of course every child is a total individual, so therapies may or may not work with them. I love the multi-agency approach, but I suppose a lot of ongoing cooperation and flexibility is required.”

So, what next?

I think national changes in assessment and curriculum do give schools more autonomy and flexibility to be inclusive.  However, settings and practitioners need to give more thought to synthesising information and seeing the ‘whole’ child, as they progress into being ‘whole’ adults too.  I have always encouraged settings to align their vision / mission statement to the principles of the SENDCoP (p19, Section 19 CfA).  However, we now have a mandate to align these principles (which are universal and apply to all children/families) to the ‘intent’ and ‘implementation’ of any curriculum we deliver.

The second item on my wish list: I’d like to see those who write Assessment Advices and those who use them to write EHCPs become more intentional in how they synthesise information.  Demonstrating joint-up thinking in practice and provision. Considering the child, as a whole.  This takes skill and I do feel more training is required in this area.

Finally, I would like to see a more robust approach, at local authority level regarding how quality assurance can be brought into the system.  Not as an after-thought, but as part of the process.  This may involve changes in the law and extending the timeline.

To conclude the SEND CoP (6.27) is clear: (underline added)

These four broad areas give an overview of the range of needs that should be planned for. The purpose of identification is to work out what action the school needs to take, not to fit a pupil into a category. In practice, individual children or young people often have needs that cut across all these areas and their needs may change over time. For instance, speech, language and communication needs can also be a feature of a number of other areas of SEN, and children and young people with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) may have needs across all areas, including particular sensory requirements. A detailed assessment of need should ensure that the full range of an individual’s needs is identified, not simply the primary need. The support provided to an individual should always be based on a full understanding of their particular strengths and needs and seek to address them all using well-evidenced interventions targeted at their areas of difficulty and where necessary specialist equipment or software.”

We, therefore, have the responsibility to make this a reality.

Postscript:  It is my intention to share further thoughts on ‘well-evidence’ interventions at a later date.  For now, if you are interested in finding out on what we are doing around the ‘Four Areas of Need’ – do get in touch.  As I shared, we have other members of #TeamADL also involved in the QA of EHCPs.

About Anita Devi

Anita has had an extensive career in education.  Her why is based around the ‘Joy of Learning’.  As such, she focuses on what enables learners and what hinders them and more importantly, what can she do to improve the system.  Amongst her many other roles, Anita leads #TeamADL

To find out more visit www.AnitaDevi.com